Reflection: Is Russia a threat in the 21st century?

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The relationship between the United States government and Russia can be called tenuous at best. Both nations have been relentlessly testing one another’s limits, and it wouldn’t be far-fetched to believe that these transgressions while escalate into armed conflict.

It should be noted that it would be nearly impossible for Russia to avoid any kind of conflict or controversy when it remains the largest country in the world, a lead producer in oil and one of the few countries with access to nuclear weapons. Even if Russia tries it’s best to avoid scrutiny, suspicion and distrust are inevitable.

Ever since the end of the Cold War in 1991 resulting in the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the subsequent reformation of government, Russia has been suffering from a multitude of conflicts and controversies that weaken the country’s stability. Economic stagnation and debt, crumbling infrastructure, attacks from Jihadists, and crime plague the nation, and these are simply the domestic threats.

It appears to many that President Vladimr Putin is attempting to revitalize the Soviet Union, and despite Russia’s threats from within, Russia is still a world power and a member of the European Council. Russia certainly has the resources to restart the Workers Party. This has not gone unnoticed by the U.S, who also site the Russian government’s numerous human rights violations such as media restrictions and the allegations in the murders of journalists. Russia claims most of the allegations from the U.S. are baseless and fabricated.

So what will happen? Russia still has access to the weapons purchased by the Soviet Union during the Cold War, and it’s possible they could become allies with China and North Korea, two other nations with a desire to turn back to communism. I fear that if America were ever to enter a war, we would be facing not one country, but possibly three. Yes, we may have the support of South Korea, Japan, and most of Europe, but no one will leave this conflict unscathed.

I suppose it all depends on how can keep their temper in check.

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