EDITORIAL: Reflecting on Kavanaugh’s new position

FILE - In this Sept. 4, 2018 photo, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, listens to Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J. speak during a Senate Judiciary Committee nominations hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. FBI agents interviewed one of the three women who have accused Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct as Republicans and Democrats quarreled over whether the bureau would have enough time and freedom to conduct a thorough investigation before a high-stakes vote on his nomination to the nation's highest court. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

FILE - In this Sept. 4, 2018 photo, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, listens to Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J. speak during a Senate Judiciary Committee nominations hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. FBI agents interviewed one of the three women who have accused Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct as Republicans and Democrats quarreled over whether the bureau would have enough time and freedom to conduct a thorough investigation before a high-stakes vote on his nomination to the nation's highest court. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh was officially sworn in this week. America is in a divided uproar. If our country wasn’t in chaos before, we definitely are now. (Which it was. America was a hot mess, and now it’s an explosion.)

Why was he sworn in? Apparently, the FBI investigation led to Kavanaugh being “proven innocent” to quote Trump. There are so many things wrong with that statement that I don’t even know where to begin.

First of all, are we going to completely discount Ford’s heartfelt testimony against Kavanaugh? A lot of people are doing just that. They’re claiming that her story was made up and blamed the Democratic party as a whole for trying to ruin the Republicans. And yet, most people truly don’t understand how hard that must have been for Ford. Not the Democrats, not the Republicans, not Kavanaugh or Trump, not me.

Only a victim of sexual assault really understands.

“Why didn’t she say it sooner?” “Why did she choose to say it now?” Some of the Republicans are basically implying that Ford’s timing is meant to intentionally harm Kavanaugh. Is this what our country has turned to – harassing and shaming victims of sexual assault simply because it makes the person being accused look bad? Actions should have consequences.

After both testimonies were finished, an FBI investigation was called to probe Kavanaugh. It was supposed to last a week. It was supposed to collect a large amount of information. It was supposed to do something, at least.

The Republicans who voted for Kavanaugh probably knew they were going to support him before a single testimony took place. This investigation was worthless to begin with, a show some Republicans put on just to say they fairly investigated him. Well, they didn’t let it go for the full week, they didn’t collect all the information they could, and it didn’t do anything.

And I guess it makes perfect sense. These days, actions have no consequences. Trump’s reign in office has proven that for sure.

Kavanaugh is now officially a judge. He was elected to a position he doesn’t deserve, not to mention his lack of qualifications.

Yes, I’m aware he went to Yale. He only repeated it multiple times in an attempt to prove to others just how qualified he is. However, it takes a lot more than a good education to be in such a high position. It takes an even-tempered, understanding, non-biased person. All of these are qualities Kavanaugh doesn’t possess.

Throughout his testimony, the two central emotions he displayed were anger and self-pity. He switched between them very quickly, which I find hard to grasp. Emotions that strong usually last longer than a minute. Instead, Kavanaugh proved that he had an ever-changing temper.

Kavanaugh has been put in a position he doesn’t belong in. He should start working on his temperament and clearing his name instead of hiding behind Trump like a coward.

He owes it to our country.